Iodine Global Network (IGN)

26.02.2021   IDD Newsletter 1/2021

In this issue:
  • First national survey in Angola shows adequate iodine status in non-pregnant women and 74% household coverage with iodized salt
  • New salt bill in Bangladesh: a commitment to human development
  • New Dietary Guidelines for Americans emphasize iodine for a healthy pregnancy
  • Excess iodine intake in Colombia
  • Iodine intakes are just sufficient among pregnant women in southern Zambia
  • How salt is harvested (and iodized) from one of the saltiest lakes in the world
  • People who eat seaweed regularly may have excessive iodine intakes
  • From endemic cretinism to iodine sufficiency: the Tuva story
  • Iodine intake in older adults in South Africa and Ghana is sufficient but may be at risk from salt-reduction strategies

Meetings & Announcements:
  • Padma Shri finally catches up with Dr. Chandrakant Pandav, the 'Iodine Man of India'
  • Dr. Werner Schultink: the new Executive Director for IGN
  • Amal Tucker Brown: the new IGN Regional Coordinator for West and Central Africa
  • Dr. Renuka Jayatissa: the new IGN Regional Coordinator for South Asia
  • In memoriam: Prof. Borislav Karanfilski

Articles

First national survey in Angola shows adequate iodine status in nonpregnant women and 74% household coverage with iodized salt

(Michael Zimmermann)
In 2014, IGN ranked Angola among the 10 countries with the highest prevalence of iodine deficiency in children, with an estimated 520,000 children at risk. Over the past decade, the salt iodization program in Angola has made considerable progress.

New salt bill in Bangladesh: a commitment to human development

(Saiqa Siraj, Tomoko Nishimoto)
Despite steep challenges, including frequent natural disasters, poverty rates, and the COVID-19 pandemic, Bangladesh has defied the odds to make progress in its development goals.

New Dietary Guidelines for Americans emphasize iodine for a healthy pregnancy

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has released its “2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans”.

Excess iodine intake in Colombia

(Excerpted from: Rachael J Beer, Oscar F Herrán, Eduardo Villamor https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa392)
In this nationally representative survey, Colombian children and WRA had an mUIC well above 300 g/L, the WHOrecommended cutpoint to identify excessive iodine.

Iodine intakes are just sufficient among pregnant women in southern Zambia

(Excerpted from: Kaile T, et al. BMC Nutr 6, 71 (2020).)
Iodine deficiency had previously been a public health concern in Zambia. A goiter prevalence of 38% was reported among children in Serenje District in Central Province as far back as 1951. This was followed by a nationwide survey that involved 37 Districts from 8 provinces using goiter detected by neck palpation as a maker of iodine deficiency in 1971. The study found a goiter prevalence of 50.5% with a range from 27 to 81% across the whole country.

How salt is harvested (and iodized) from one of the saltiest lakes in the world

(Dennis Lee The Takeout)
Lake Retba in Senegal is one of the saltiest lakes in the world. Compared to the Dead Sea, which contains 260 grams of salt per liter of water, the Pink Lake, as it’s called, has 380 grams per liter of water.

People who eat seaweed regularly may have excessive iodine intakes

(Excerpted from: Markhus. M. W., et al. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113483)
During recent years, seaweeds have become increasingly popular in diets in Europe and North America. The aim of a recent study was to describe iodine intake and iodine status in a group of seaweed (termed macroalgae) consumers in Norway, and to report on their thyroid function.

From endemic cretinism to iodine sufficiency: the Tuva story

(E. Troshina, N. Mazurina, E. Sehyushkina, A. Darzhaa)
Tuva is a remote, biodiverse Russian republic in southern Siberia, populated by traditionally nomadic, yurt-dwelling tribes, and borders Mongolia in the south.

Iodine intake in older adults in South Africa and Ghana is sufficient but may be at risk from salt-reduction strategies

(Excerpted from: Menyanu E et al. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2020.111065)
This study found that in a sample of South African adults surveyed after introduction of a salt-reduction policy, those with low salt intake (<5 g/d) had inadequate iodine intake (using 24-h UIE as a biomarker of intake), but this was not observed in a sample of Ghanaian adults.

 

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