Iodine Global Network (IGN)

28.08.2020   IDD Newsletter 3/2020

In this issue
  • Revived salt iodization in Lebanon ensures adequate iodine during pregnancy
  • Deficient iodine intakes in US pregnant women
  • Norway considers iodization of household salt and salt in bread
  • Cambodia scrambles to revive a lapsed salt iodization program
  • Iodine deficiency in British pregnant women predicts poor birth outcomes but not later child development
  • Iodized salt continues to provide adequate iodine to Palestinian children
  • Regularly consumed, seafood can be a good source of dietary iodine
  • Enormous decrease in iodine deficiency-related disability in Ethiopia
  • Challenges and opportunities of salt double fortified with iron and iodine
  • Strong variations in iodine status in young women across Tanzania

Articles

Revived salt iodization in Lebanon ensures adequate iodine during pregnancy

(Prof. Omar Obeid)
A transformed and renewed salt iodization program in Lebanon ensures pregnant women have adequate iodine intakes during pregnancy.

Deficient iodine intakes in US pregnant women

(From JM Kerver, et al.)
Endemic iodine deficiency was historically common in the midwestern US, but following voluntary salt iodization in the 1920s, US iodine status was thought to be adequate. However, data from national surveys indicate a sharp decline in estimated iodine intake in recent decades, with the decline thought to be mainly due to changes in commercial processing of milk and bread.

Norway considers iodization of household salt and salt in bread

(Opinion of the Panel on Nutrition of the Norwegian Scientific Committee for Food and Environment)
To ensure adequate iodine intake in the population, particularly in young women, Norwegian experts recently assessed the potential benefits and risks of iodization of household salt and industrialized salt in bread.

Cambodia scrambles to revive a lapsed salt iodization program

(From: Codling K, et al. Universal Salt Iodisation)
In Cambodia, a successful iodized salt program fell apart, but is being rebuilt through renewed government and salt industry commitment.

Iodine deficiency in British pregnant women predicts poor birth outcomes but not later child development

(From: Threapleton DE, et al. Maternal iodine status in a multi-ethnic UK birth cohort)
In pregnant women with mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency in the 2nd trimester, poorer maternal iodine status was associated with low birthweight but did not predict child development at age 4–7 years.

Iodized salt continues to provide adequate iodine to Palestinian children

(From: S Massad et al. Micronutrient status of Palestinian school children)
Despite widespread household food insecurity, Palestinian children living in the West Bank are iodine sufficient.

Regularly consumed, seafood can be a good source of dietary iodine

(From: Øyen J et al. Lean-seafood intake increases urinary iodine concentrations and plasma selenium )
Two Norwegian intervention studies show the value of eating seafood on iodine intakes.

Enormous decrease in iodine deficiency-related disability in Ethiopia

(From: Hassen HY, et al. National incidence, prevalence and disability-adjusted life years)
From 1990 to 2017, disability due to moderate-to-severe iodine deficiency in Ethiopia decreased by 90%, likely due to the introduction of iodized salt.

Challenges and opportunities of salt double fortified with iron and iodine

(From: The Double Fortified Salt Consultation Steering Group)
Leveraging the success of salt iodization, there has been interest to explore the feasibility of adding iron to iodized salt to produce double fortified salt.

Strong variations in iodine status in young women across Tanzania

(Ba, DM, et al.)
There is heterogeneity in iodine status across regions of Tanzania among women of reproductive age, due to poverty, consuming inadequately iodized salt, and lack of education.

 

The Iodine Blog

Follow our progress monthly by signing up to receive the Iodine Blog.