Iodine Global Network (IGN)

15.05.2020   IDD Newsletter 2/2020

In this issue:
  • COVID-19 series
> Fortification of staple foods is a critical weapon in the fight against COVID-19
> COVID-19 lockdown and two wet spells bring salt farmers misery in Andhra Pradesh, India
> Haitian iodized salt program weathers the COVID-19 storm
> Ekaterina Troshina, IGN national coordinators for Russia, on the frontlines against COVID-19
> Iodized salt coverage and COVID-19 in MENA/EMR
  • Estimating the global benefits of salt iodization to correct IDD
  • Low iodine intakes in Israeli pregnant women
  • Global Scorecard of iodine nutrition in 2020: optimal iodine intake in 131 countries
  • Iodized salt in processed foods in Armenia
  • Izzeldin Huseein, IGN Regional Coordinator in the Middle East and North Africa
  • Festo Kavishe, IGN Regional Coordinator for Eastern and Southern Africa
  • Two decades of sustained salt iodization in Sri Lanka

Articles

COVID-19 series

(Various Authors)
In late 2019 a novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 causing Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) appeared in Wuhan China, and on 11th March 2020, WHO declared it to have developed pandemic status. The pandemic has since touched every aspect of our lives, and iodized salt programs have not been spared. This series of articles discuss the impact of the pandemic and the lockdown on iodine programs across the world, from South East Asia, to India, Haiti, Russia and the Middle East North Africa region.

Estimating the global benefits of salt iodization to correct IDD

(From: Gorstein J, et all. Estimating the Health and Economic Benefits of Universal Salt Iodization)
There has been tremendous progress over the past twenty-five years to control iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) through universal salt iodization (USI). The authors used a novel approach to estimate the impact of USI on IDD, applying a regression model derived from observational data on the relationship between the total goiter rate (TGR) and the MUIC from 24 countries.

Low iodine intakes in Israeli pregnant women

(From: Rosen et al. Low intake of iodized salt and iodine containing supplements among pregnant women)
Iodine is an essential nutrient for human health throughout the life cycle, especially during early stages of intrauterine life and infancy, to ensure adequate neurocognitive development. The case of Israel may be instructive for exploring the link between iodine status and habitual iodine intake in the setting of extensive national reliance on desalinated water.

Global Scorecard of iodine nutrition in 2020: optimal iodine intake in 131 countries

(Iodine Global Network)
The Iodine Global Network has produced the 2020 version of the Global Scorecard on the status of iodine nutrition. The Scorecard contains the most recent median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) data from 194 WHO Member States plus Liechtenstein and Palestine. The 2020 update includes 26 new nationally representative surveys and sub-national data for five additional countries.

Iodized salt in processed foods in Armenia

(Hrayr Aslanyan, Alexander Bazarchyan, Gregory Gerasimov)
Located in the South Caucasus, Armenia was historically affected by endemic goiter that was virtually eliminated in early 1970s as part of effective salt iodization strategy in the USSR. Iodide deficiency returned in 1991 when Armenia became independent after dissolution of the Soviet Union. However, starting from 1999, production of iodized salt was resumed by sole national salt producer “Avansalt”. In 2004 the government passed decree No. 353-N making production and importation of iodized salt mandatory as well as its use at household level and for food processing.

Izzeldin Hussein, IGN Regional Coordinator in the Middle East and North Africa

Festo Kavihe, IGN Regional Coordinator for Eastern and Southern Africa

Two decades of sustained salt iodization in Sri Lanka

(From Jayatissa R, et al. Stable Iodine Nutiriton During Two Decades of Continuous Universal Salt...)
Bennet and Pridham first referred to the existence of endemic goiter along the coast of Galle in the southern province of Sri Lanka in 1849. Since the introduction of USI, four national iodine surveys have assessed the iodine nutrition status of the population. The authors retrospectively reviewed median urine iodine concentration (mUIC) and goiter prevalence in 16,910 schoolchildren (6-12 years) in all nine provinces of Sri Lanka, the mUIC of pregnant women, drinking-water iodine level, and the percentage of households consuming adequately (15 mg/kg) iodized salt (household salt iodine, HHIS).