Iodine Global Network (IGN)

12.03.2020   IDD Newsletter 1/2020

In this issue:
  • Iodized oil to combat severe IDD and cretinism in Papua New Guinea
  • Iodine Symposium at the 2019 American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting
  • Ensuring iodine lab capacity and performance in Africa: the role of the Tanzania Food and Nutrition Centre
  • Iodine fortification of foods and condiments, other than salt, for preventing iodine deficiency disorders
  • Establishing salt iodization in Kenya: personal reminiscences of Mr. Wilfred Kimiri
  • China's universal salt iodization program boosted school enrollment
  • Iodine - essential for mothers to be in the UK
  • Uzbekistan: Low iodine intakes in pregnant women reflect poor coverage with iodized salt
  • Iodine status in Tunisia two decades after universal salt iodization

Articles

Iodized oil to combat severe IDD and cretinism in Papua New Guinea

(Prof. Victor Temple et al.)
From Feb 16-24, 2020, Michael Zimmermann, Chair of the Iodine Global Network (IGN), visited Papua New Guinea on the invitation of Victor Temple, IGN National Coordinator, to assess the current status of the iodine program with a focus on urgent distribution of iodized oil in areas affected by severe iodine deficiency.

Iodine Symposium at the 2019 American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting

(Elizabeth N. Pearce)
A symposium, “Iodine and Health,” was jointly sponsored by IGN and the American Thyroid Association (ATA) at the ATA’s annual meeting in Chicago on October 31, 2019.

Ensuring iodine lab capacity and performance in Africa: the role of the Tanzania Food and Nutrition Centre

(Dr Fatma Abdallah, Michael Maganga, Dr. Vincent Assey)
Tanzania is among the few countries in Africa that has received training to build capacity of monitoring and assessing impact of interventions towards reduction and/or elimination of micronutrient malnutrition.

Iodine fortification of foods and condiments, other than salt, for preventing iodine deficiency disorders

(Joseph Alvin R Santos et al.)
Salt iodization is the preferred strategy for IDD prevention and control, however, in some instances where salt is not the major condiment, alternate vehicles for iodine fortification have been considered. The objective of this review was to assess the effects of fortifying foods, beverages, condiments, or seasonings other than salt with iodine alone or in conjunction with other micronutrients, on iodine status and health-related outcomes in all populations.

Establishing salt iodization in Kenya: personal reminiscences of Mr. Wilfred Kimiri

(Carole Tom)
Mr. Kimiri was interviewed by Carole Tom in Nairobi, in February 2020.

China’s universal salt iodization program boosted school enrollment

(Excerpted from: Huang Q et al.; Journal of Comparative Economics. 2020; 48: 20-36.)
China had over 700 million people living in areas suffering from IDD in the early 1990s. To eliminate IDD by 2000, the Chinese government initiated a USI policy on October 1, 1994, which mandated the iodization of edible salt throughout the country.

Iodine – essential for mothers to be in the UK

(Excerpted from: Prentice M et al. Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.)
The most recent survey National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) in te UK was published in 2018, related to the years 2014–15. The data indicated that the median urinary iodine concentration for women aged 16–49 years from 2014–15 was 102 g/L. Although this median value met the WHO criterion for adequate intake for the general population, it does not meet the criterion for iodine sufficiency in pregnant and lactating women (ie, median urinary iodine concentration within 150–249 g/L). This finding suggests a substantial public health issue affecting neonates, which urgently requires corrective strategies.

Uzbekistan: Low iodine intakes in pregnant women reflect poor coverage with iodized salt

(Gregory Gerasimov)
Results of 2017 Uzbekistan Nutrition Survey (UNS 2017) were recently published by UNICEF and provide an important update on the use of iodized salt and iodine status of women of reproductive age and pregnant women in this country.

Iodine status in Tunisia two decades after universal salt iodization

(Radhouene Doggui et al.)
In Tunisia, the first national cross-sectional assessment was conducted in 1973-75 among 9940 individuals from all age classes. It revealed a goiter rate of 9.3% in the inland mountain areas, and a mild iodine deficiency with a median UIC below 50 µg/L among a national sample.
To address iodine deficiency disorders, in 1984, the Tunisian government regulated the commercialization of iodized salt (with a compulsory iodization at 15-25 ppm, either with KIO3 or KI) in the North Western region.