Iodine Global Network (IGN)

IODINE Global Network

30.11.2018   IDD Newsletter 4/2018

In this issue:
  • Women in Burundi have inadequate iodine intakes
  • Iodine nutrition: recent research and unanswered questions
  • Young women in Madagascar have alarmingly low iodine intakes
  • Norway: mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency in the world’s largest pregnancy and birth cohort
  • Iodine cookbook: a recipe for improved iodine intakes in the UK
  • Continued efforts are key to sustaining iodine sufficiency in Macedonia
  • Raising awareness of iodized salt in Benin
  • Bread overtakes dairy to improve iodine intake in New Zealand

In Meetings and Announcements:
  • GiveWell announces that IGN is a ‘standout’ charity for the fifth time
  • Global Fortification Data Exchange (GFDx) launched in Spanish
  • IGN advocates for iodine health in the UK
  • On World Iodine Day, “I” goes missing in the Indian Times
  • In Memoriam: Nicté Ramírez and Ma Tai

Articles

Women in Burundi have inadequate iodine intakes

(Dr Allain Parfait, Dr Sabas Kimboka, Dr Vincent Assey, Dr Festo Kavishe, Dr Jonathan Gorstein)
A national householdbased survey was carried out in February 2018 to determine the iodine content in salt consumed at household level and the urinary iodine concentration in women of reproductive age (15–49 years) in Burundi.

Iodine nutrition: recent research and unanswered questions

(Elizabeth N Pearce)
Many adverse consequences of iodine deficiency have long been known, but new associations are still being studied and uncovered.

Young women in Madagascar have alarmingly low iodine intakes

(Excerpted from: Randremanana RV et al. Maternal & Child Nutrition. 2018 Oct:e12717.)
To assess the national salt iodization program almost two decades after the promulgation of the salt iodization legislation in Madagascar, the first nationally representative survey of iodine status was conducted from November 2015 to January 2016.

Mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency in the world’s largest pregnancy and birth cohort

(Marianne Hope Abel, Helle Margrete Meltzer, Heidi Aase, Liv Elin Torheim, Anne Lise Brantsæter)
In Norway, one in every four children born in the years 2002–08 is a participant of a large national pregnancy cohort. The study has revealed that the mothers were mild-to-moderately iodine deficient during pregnancy. Results have now been published that link insufficient maternal iodine intake to poorer child neurocognitive development.

Iodine cookbook: a recipe for improved iodine intakes in the UK

(Tattersall J, Henderson D, Dineva M, Bath S, Rayman M.)
In the UK, iodine deficiency has been reported in several population groups, most notably in pregnant women, young women, and those who exclude certain food groups, e.g. vegans. A new iodine-rich recipe book was developed by three students at the University of Surrey, supervised by Sarah Bath and Margaret Rayman, to help improve iodine intake, with support from the EUthyroid project.

Continued efforts are key to sustaining iodine sufficiency in Macedonia

(B Karanfilski, N Milevska-Kostova, D Miladinova, V Jovanovska, M Kocho)
A recent publication has classified the Republic of Macedonia as one of eleven countries to achieve sustainable elimination of iodine deficiency. This success is a result of cross-sectoral efforts under the guidance of the National Committee for Iodine Deficiency, and significant involvement of the professional and academic community, including its key institutions: Institute of Pathophysiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Clinic for Child Diseases, and University Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics.

Raising awareness of iodized salt in Benin

(E. Jacques Hougbenou Houngla)
On Saturday, October 27, Benin marked the 21st “National day of mobilization for the fight against iodine deficiency disorders” (Journée nationale de mobilisation pour la lutte contre les troubles dus à la carence en iode).

Bread overtakes dairy to improve iodine intake in New Zealand

(Excerpted from: Pearson A et al. 2016 New Zealand Total Diet Study. 2018)
According to the latest New Zealand Total Diet Study (2016 NZTDS), the declining intake of iodine has been reversed for the first time since the mid-1990s thanks to the mandatory use of iodized salt in bread manufacture.

 

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