Iodine Global Network (IGN)

IODINE Global Network

04.12.2017   IDD Newsletter 4/2017

In this issue:
  • Salt iodization in Armenia: a model of sustained success
  • Iodine supplementation in mildly iodine-deficient pregnant women does not benefit infant or child neurodevelopment (a randomized-controlled trial)
  • Sentinel surveys in northern Algeria assess iodine intake in women
  • Iodine in food systems and health: WIA global conference
  • Making Europe smarter with harmonized assessment of iodine status
  • Can legislation on salt iodization be harmonized in Europe?
  • Transforming the salt industry in Tanzania to remove obstacles to USI
  • Iodized bouillon to prevent iodine deficiency in Vietnam
  • A new strategy for the elimination of iodine deficiency in North Korea
  • Paleolithic weight-loss diet puts women at risk of iodine deficiency
  • Iodine: the European landscape

In Meetings and Announcements:
  • IGN named a 'standout' charity for the forth year in a row
  • IGN joins forces with INCAP to sustain USI in Central America
  • IGN represented at the 70th WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia
  • Founders Pledge: Food for thought
  • 87th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association
  • Obituary: Dr. Mahmoud Fikri (WHO Regional Director, EMRO)

Salt iodization in Armenia: a model of sustained success

(Nicholas Hutchings, Gregory Gerasimov)
By sustaining universal salt iodization (USI), Armenia has remained iodine sufficient for over a decade, effectively protecting newborns against brain damage and loss of I.Q. points.

Iodine supplementation in mildly iodine-deficient pregnant women does not benefit infant or child neurodevelopment

(Excerpted from: Gowachirapant S, et al. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2017, October 10.)
This is the first randomized placebo-controlled trial investigating the impact of iodine supplementation of mildly iodine-deficient pregnant women on child neurodevelopment.

Sentinel surveys in northern Algeria assess iodine intake in women

(Samira Akdader, Hamoul Zohra, Meskine Djamila, Michael Zimmermann)
A recent sentinel survey in northern Algeria suggests iodine intakes are optimal in pregnant women but borderline high in women of reproductive age.

Iodine in food systems and health

First international conference of the World Iodine Association (WIA), 15-17 November 2017, Pisa, Italy

Making Europe smarter with harmonized assessment of iodine status

(EUthyroid Consortium)
Harmonized assessment of iodine status in Europe has the potential to overcome negative health outcomes of iodine deficiency, including cognitive deficiencies.

Can legislation on salt iodization be harmonized in Europe?

(Wouter Lox, Managing Director, EU Salt)
The joint WHO and UNICEF report published in 2007 on “Iodine deficiency in Europe: A continuing public health problem” described the situation of iodine deficiency in Europe as a major public health concern. Here, we aim to identify the missing ingredient and propose a solution that could help to eliminate iodine deficiency in Europe.

Transforming the salt industry in Tanzania to remove obstacles to USI

(Vincent Assey, Jonathan Gorstein, Robin Houston, Festo Kavishe, Banda Ndiaye, Alister Shields)
In December 2016, the Iodine Global Network with support from Nutrition International, and in partnership with UNICEF, GAIN, TFNC and other national stakeholders, conducted a comprehensive review of Tanzania’s IDD program to determine its current status, identify gaps, and recommend steps to improve the supply and use of adequately iodized salt.

Iodized bouillon to prevent iodine deficiency in Vietnam

(Excerpted from: ‘3 Mièn Bouillon’ to prevent iodine deficiency. Viet Nam News, November 28, 2017)
In response to the alarming news of iodine deficiency in Vietnam, UNIBEN Company actively collaborated with experts from the Nutrition Center of HCM City to develop a new food product, iodized bouillon, and distributed it to millions of Vietnamese families.

A new strategy for the elimination of iodine deficiency in North Korea

(Karen Codling)
Iodine deficiency was first recorded in North Korea in 1995, and the government started efforts to produce iodized salt soon after. On the invitation of UNICEF, the Iodine Global Network visited in January 2016.

Paleolithic weight-loss diet puts women at risk of iodine deficiency

(Excerpted from Manousou S et al. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition)
A Paleolithic-type weight-loss diet (known as paleo diet or PD) has beneficial metabolic effects, but it excludes two largest iodine sources: table salt and dairy products. A 2-year randomized trial compared the risk of iodine deficiency in Swedish women on a PD compared with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) diet.

 

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