Iodine Global Network (IGN)

IODINE Global Network

07.06.2017   IDD Newsletter 2/2017

In this issue:
  • Brazil is iodine-sufficient after lowering iodine levels in salt
  • Poor rural populations often have lower access to adequately iodized salt
  • Iodine-rich groundwater, and not iodized salt, provides children and pregnant women in Djibouti with sufficient iodine
  • Mapping and tracking global food fortification efforts
  • Mozambique renews its commitment to salt iodization
  • National survey in Israel reports one of the lowest iodine intakes in the world
  • Has the UK really become iodine sufficient?
  • Can processed foods containing iodized salt contribute to dietary iodine intake?
  • Towards the elimination of IDD by 2020

In Meetings and Announcements:
  • Eliminating iodine deficiency disorders by 2020
  • Talking about iodine deficiency during ITAW and on 10th World Thyroid Day
  • Dr. Chandrakant Pandav awarded for his life-long contribution to public health
  • Iodine in Food Systems and Health: the 1st International WIA Conference

Brazil iodine sufficient after lowering salt iodine levels

(Eduardo Tomimori et al)
A national survey, conducted in 2008–2009 and 2013–2014, assessed iodine status in Brazilian children after a reduction in the iodine levels in edible salt.

Poor rural populations often have lower access to adequately iodized salt

(Excerpted from: Knowles JM et al.)
A recent review of household iodized salt coverage data explores subnational disparities in access to adequately iodized salt by residence type and socioeconomic status in 10 countries: Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Niger, the Philippines, Senegal, Tanzania, and Uganda. This work provides important insights to guide future national strategies to achieve USI.

Iodine-rich groundwater, and not iodized salt, provides children and pregnant women in Djibouti with sufficient iodine

(Izzeldin Hussein IGN)
A small country in the Horn of Africa, Djibouti has a population of less than 1 million, with six out of ten inhabitants living in the capital city. In 2015, the IGN in partnership with UNICEF supported a new national iodine survey in Djibouti to assess the current status of iodine nutrition among SAC and pregnant women, and access to iodized salt.

Mapping and tracking global food fortification efforts

(Karen Codling et al.)
Preventable micronutrient malnutrition, or “hidden hunger,” is responsible for approximately 10% of the global disease burden; it inhibits human development and perpetuates poverty and deprivation. For decades, fortification of common staple foods such as wheat and maize flour, rice, oil, and salt has been instrumental in preventing the devastating consequences of deficient intakes of vitamin A, vitamin D, iron, iodine, and folic acid.

Mozambique renews its commitment to salt iodization

(Nilsa Miquidade, Vincent Assey)
Mozambique is a country in south-eastern Africa on the Indian Ocean with an estimated population of 28 million.

National survey in Israel reports one of the lowest iodine intakes in the world

(Excerpted from: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170327083438.htm)
The first national iodine survey conducted in Israel has revealed a high burden of iodine deficiency among Israeli schoolchildren and pregnant women. Government funding and legislation, and a government-regulated programme of salt iodization, are essential to reducing this burden, which poses a high risk of impaired neurological development.

Has the UK really become iodine sufficient?

(Excerpted from: Bath SC, Rayman MP. The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. 2017 Apr 24.)
In December, 2016, the Iodine Global Network published its new map of global iodine nutrition. Notably, the status of the UK, which was classified as mildly iodine deficient in 2014–15, had become adequate by 2016.

Can processed foods containing iodized salt contribute to dietary iodine intake?

(Robin Houston et al.)
A Technical Consultation on assessing the contribution of processed foods to iodine and salt intake took place in Dakar, Senegal on February 13–14, 2017. Facilitated by the Iodine Global Network, the meeting had broad agency representation including UNICEF, GAIN, Micronutrient Initiative, Helen Keller International, GroundWork, and The George Institute for Global Health.

The IGN’s 2016 Annual Report: Towards the elimination of IDD by 2020

(Jonathan Gorstein)
2016 was a positive and productive year for the IGN and the lobal effort towards the elimination of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). In April 2016, we marked 30 years since the founding of the International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD). Today, as the Iodine Global Network (IGN), our work continues to be guided by four core pillars:

 

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